In general, I think we need to move away from the premise that being a good person is a fixed immutable characteristic and shift towards seeing being good as a practice. And it is a practice that we carry out by engaging with our imperfections. We need to shift towards thinking that being a good person is like being a clean person. Being a clean person is something you maintain and work on every day.We don’t assume ‘I am a clean person therefore I don’t need to brush my teeth.’ When someone suggests to us that we have something stuck in our teeth we don’t say to them ‘What do you mean I have something stuck in my teeth—but I’m a clean person?!’ — Jay Smooth in his TED speech “how I learned to stop worrying and love discussing race” (via tropicanastasia)

(via spookyskookin)

ameliasfairytales:

G R E E N D A L E   S E V E N  Appreciation  Week(s) 

DAY Eight: Abed Nadir Love day

Britta, I’ve got self esteem falling out of my butt. That’s why I was willing to change for you guys because when you know who you are and what you like about yourself, changing for other people isn’t such a big deal.

(via buffyannesummers)

Whatever one’s assessment of the crimes committed by Communist leaders, it is unwise for capitalism’s cheerleaders to play the body-count game, because if people like me have to account for the gulag and the Great Sparrow campaign, they’ll have to account for the slave trade, indigenous extermination, “Late Victorian Holocausts” and every war, genocide and massacre carried out by the US and its proxies in the effort to defeat communism. Since the pro-capitalist set cares so deeply for the suffering of the Russian and Chinese masses, perhaps they’ll even want to account for the millions of deaths resulting from those countries’ transitions to capitalism.

It should be intuitive that capitalism, which glorifies rapid growth amidst ruthless competition, would produce great acts of violence and deprivation, but somehow its defenders are convinced that it is always and everywhere a force for righteousness and liberation. Let them try to convince the tens of millions of people who die of malnutrition every year because the free market is incapable of engineering a situation in which less than half of the world’s food is thrown away.

The 100 million deaths that are perhaps most important to focus on right now are the ones that international human rights organization DARA projected will die climate-borne deaths between 2012 and 2030. 100 million more will follow those, and they will not take 18 years to die. Famine like the human species has never known is in the offing because the free market does not price carbon and oil-extracting capitalist firms have, since the collapse of the USSR, become sovereigns of their own. The most virulent anti-communists have a very handy, if morally disgraceful, way of treating this mass extinction event: they deny that it’s happening.

Why You’re Wrong About Communism: 7 Huge Misconceptions About Communism and Capitalism on Salon.com (via callingoutbigotry)

(via spookyskookin)

Doctor Who meme | six companions [2/6]

(via buffyannesummers)

But why Sailor Moon?

Takeuchi’s greatest strength as a creator is characterization, and it is this to which fans primarily rally today. Sailor Moon’s cast is massive — and they are nearly all female, from the heroes to the villains to the sidekicks. This manifold nature removes the burden of representation from any one or two female characters as is the case in most media: Usagi can be emotional, flighty, and boy-crazy, and still a wonderful heroine because she doesn’t stand for half the population.

In this way, watching Sailor Moon as a woman is like suddenly realizing you’ve been drowning and taking a big gulp of air — the female characters can just be. You don’t cringe internally when one of them becomes a love interest, or is grievously injured, or fails. It is so relaxing to indulge in, so genuinely escapist to put aside that tally one keeps in their head of deaths, rapes, and de-powerings.

To a young girl, Sailor Moon is a fantasy she didn’t know she wanted; to a woman, it is mental and emotional respite. How often do we find stories by, and almost entirely about women?

— Juliet Kahn, Nostalgia as a Weapon: the Sailor Moon Renaissance is a Feminist Mission Behind the Lines of Pop Culture (via secretivedreams)

(via robotmango)

Look me in the eye and do it. Do it, you c o w a r d .

(via buffyannesummers)

The Russian peasant imagined the social order among demons to be much like his own. They lived in families and were fond of smoking, drinking, and playing cards or bones. Normally devils married witches, and their weddings, often celebrated at a crossroad, were frenzied affairs; sometimes in their wild dancing they raised a column of dust to the sky. Here and there one finds the belief that it was possible to disperse such gatherings by throwing an axe or a knife at the witch. Afterwards blood would be found on the spot and a village woman might walk around with a bandaged face or hand. Some peasants in Tula Province stressed that devils did not live in lawful wedlock because they lacked priests. Snowstorms and windstorms were generally associated with the activity of devils on earth; the notion that devil children liked to play in them was widespread. In Novgorod Province it was believed that one could view the devil during a snowstorm by getting down on all fours and looking through one’s legs.

Russian Folk Belief, by Linda J. Ivanits (via gatheringbones)

#you know how sometimes when you look at a sliver of history#you can just hear a babble and ruckus of stories hollering to get out#there are so many stories here it’s deafening#the crossroad weddings of devils and witches dancing up the dust to frenzy#little devil-children larking and raucous in storms#whole towns built on occult belief; a domestic world casually acquainted with the traffic of hellfolk#russian folklore is grim and wonderful#russia#mythology#and all the devils are here (tags by elucipher)

(via outpastthemoat)

notyourexrotic:


This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZPhoto credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

notyourexrotic:

This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. 

The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” 

In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.

This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” 

To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZ

Photo credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

(via spookyskookin)

My goal was always to make you feel a little better about yourself and the world when you finished watching an episode of psych […] i hope it’s one of those things that makes people happy and continues to make them happy.’ -Steve Franks

(via buffyannesummers)

Album Art

vineandleaf:

naïve melody (this must be the place) || talking heads

i’m just an animal
looking for a home
share the same space
for a minute or two

(via spookyskookin)

ArtistTalking Heads
TitleNaive Melody (This Must Be The Place)
AlbumStop Making Sense